Thursday, August 13, 2009



The three major coastal marine plants are algae, seagrasses and mangrove trees.  Algae are  primitive plants, which do not have true roots, leaves or stems.  An important reef-building algae is the red coralline algae, which actually secretes a hard limestone skeleton that can encrust and cement dead coral together.  Seagrasses are modern plants that produce flowers, fruits and seeds for reproduction. As their name suggests, they generally look like large blades of grass growing underwater in sand near the shore. Thallasia sp. and Zastera spp. are the common species found in the Park.
Mangroves trees can live in salty soil or water, and are found throughout the Park. An assessment of mangrove resources identified at least 19 species of true mangroves and several more species of mangrove associates within the Park's borders.


Komodo National Park includes one of the world's richest marine environments.  It consists of forams, cnidaria (includes over 260 species of reef building coral), sponges (70 species), ascidians, marine worms, mollusks, echinoderms, crustaceans, cartilaginous and bony  fishes (over 1,000 species), marine reptiles, and marine mammals (dolphins, whales, and dugongs).  Some notable species with high commercial value include sea cucumbers (Holothuria), Napoleon wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus), and groupers. 

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